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When was the last time you listened to a song with lyrics so simple, it seemed like a poem; but at the same time amazed you with the effect those simple words had on the song? I’m guessing you’ll have to recollect songs from the past thirty years and then sort your way through them. I came across this song on the morning of Christmas Eve, whilst I was strolling around in a mall, wondering what I should buy for my family. The moment the song was played, my ears commanded my brain to stop analyzing the discounted goods and listen to the song. I stood still, enjoying the warmth generated as the simple lyrics echoed through my ears. Thankfully, I could muster up some common sense and whip out my smartphone, start the ‘Shazam‘ app (thank God for technology), and identify the song. As soon as the result came up, I breathed a sigh of relief and continued with my not-so-successful shopping venture. The simplicity of the song really got to me, and I was so obsessed with the tune of the song that I drove past my house three times. Go ahead, give it a listen.

Dan Fogelberg

Dan Fogelberg

History:Same Old Lang Syne‘ is a song composed by Dan Fogelberg. The song was released to the public in 1980 as a single, only to be re-released as a part of his album titled ‘The Innocent Age‘ (1981). The song peaked at Number 9 on the Billboard Hot 100 charts. It is also one of the most frequently played songs on Christmas Eve (keep your ears open in the mall!). The song, as I suspected, is an autobiographical incident. He was visiting home after a long musical tour, when he happened to run into his old lover in the nearby grocery store. As the song suggests, they awkwardly exchanged pleasantries and decided to spend some time catching up. What follows is accurately described in the song. Jill (Dan’s former girlfriend) heard the song, and pointed out two mistakes he made – Her eyes were green, not blue; and the man she married was a teacher, not an architect. The fact being that she didn’t come forward with these inaccuracies, as it would disrupt Dan’s marriage. For the complete story, click here. There is only one version of this song, viz. the 5 Minute 20 Second Album Version.

What the song conveys: It’s painfully simple, really. The song is written in First person, and it starts with a man stumbling upon his former lover in a grocery store. They exchange awkward formalities, and decide to catch up on all the time lost. They go to have drinks in a nearby bar, but find it’s closed. Hence, they get a six-pack from the liquor store and carry on with the conversation in her car. She tells him that she’s married to an architect and, though she’d love to say it, isn’t really happy. She acknowledges his success as a singer, and proceeds to leave by giving him a kiss and driving away to her normal life.

Review: The song starts with a soothing piano note (Fogelberg), and Fogelberg initiates the vocals at 00:19. As you must have already heard, the lyrics are dreadfully simple, and powerful too. This song stands up proudly among many others and proves that it isn’t necessary to have complex words thrown in a song just to make it listenable; and that sometimes, all it takes is a simple poetic approach. The first verse, which describes their meeting, ends at 00:54. A short piano interlude ensues, after which the second verse follows suit at 01:12. Again, the simplicity of the song is the winning formula. This verse describes the transition of their conversation from the grocery store to her car. The chorus follows right after the second stanza has its share of the spotlight (01:48). The chorus features Fogelberg in a slightly higher pitch and tone. The third stanza, however, brings things back to normal (02:04). This part describes the current happenings in the woman’s life (with a nice little double entendre added in there. Tell me what you thought it was in the comments). As the third verse ends at 02:58, the chorus takes over again, and loops a second time (with slight modifications in the last two lines). The song audibly slows down after the second repetition, with the beats fading off, and extra emphasis added to the piano. The last stanza always seems to catch my attention, as the last four lines (for me) are the best lines of the song. They are:

“Just For a Moment I Was Back In School,

And Felt That Old Familiar Pain;

And As I Turned To Make My Way Back Home,

The Snow Turned Into Rain”

Beautiful, isn’t it? The song gradually fades off, ending with the original ‘Auld Lang Syne’ piano piece. If you’ve really liked the song, I’m sure you won’t hesitate hitting the repeat button again! R.I.P Dan Fogelberg!

 

Lyrics For “Same Old Lang Syne”http://artists.letssingit.com/dan-fogelberg-lyrics-same-old-lang-syne-hpx5xm1#axzz2k98mbQcV

Download Link For “Same Old Lang Syne”http://www.dididoo.com/fordid/ddd/SameOldLangSyne.mp3 (Right Click on Link, Click ‘Save Link/Target As’)

 

Album Art

“Same Old Lang Syne” is a song from Dan Fogelberg’s 1982 album titled ‘The Innocent Age’

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Probably one of the mushiest song ever, “Right Here Waiting” created a phenomenon worldwide. It won the hearts of millions all over the globe. Richard Marx has used his dreamy voice, coupled with (What I claim is) the best piano rift ever, and teary eyed lyrics and blended everything together to create the ultimate drug for romantics. For those who think it’s a pop song; think again. The genre of the song is actually ‘Soft Rock’ (Falls in the same class of “Jealous Guy” or “Bohemian Rhapsody“). Well, it’s placed at Number 2 on my ‘Top 10 mushiest Love Songs of all time’ list, and I’ll be reviewing this song today. Cheers to all the romantics who longed for this song! Let’s get started!

Richard Marx (Artist)

Richard Marx (Artist)

History: “Right Here Waiting” is actually a ballad composed and sung by Richard Marx, for his second album titled “Repeat Offender” (1989). The song went on, not only to break millions of hearts, but also records all over the world. It peaked at the Number 1 position on the Billboard Hot 100 charts, and at Number 2 on the U.K. charts. For the complete chart performance, click here. For more peak positions, click here. It was certified Gold by Canada, Silver by U.K., and Platinum by U.S. The music video was censored and considered a bit too ‘steamy’ for the public, because it featured a 42 second “softcore” sex scene. There is just one version of the song, viz. The Studio Version; having a duration of 4 Minutes 24 Seconds. [Source: Wikipedia]

What it tries to convey to us: Richard Marx actually dedicated “Right Here Waiting” for his wife, Cynthia Rhodes, when she was acting in South Africa. For us people, it’s about a loving couple who, unfortunately, break up; and the man tells her, “No matter whom you love in the future, remember this – I’ll always be there for you.” True love, isn’t it?

Review: The theme of the song is really soft – the bass, the vocals, even the piano and the acoustic guitar. The song starts off with a synthesizer rift (bass of the song). The Oh-SO-BEAUTIFUL piano rift (Courtesy Vanston) starts at 00:17, and it REALLY is magnificent. I always feel like crying (Out of joy, or sadness – who knows?). Richard Marx starts off with the vocals at 00:45. You can clearly see how beautifully he has modulated his pitch and tone, for accentuating the song. You can actually feel what he is trying to convey (For example – his “Oh can’t you see it Baby, You’ve got me going crazy”). He starts off with the first chorus at 01:17, and after a brief 6 second gap, starts off with the second stanza. The thing that keeps all of us hooked to this song is definitely it’s chorus, because.. Let’s just face it.. It’s stupendous! Richard Marx has cleverly added more number of choruses in the song, to keep the feel ‘alive’. Saying thus, the second chorus begins already at 02:16. The song may seem slow in tune and rhythm, but it’s really fast paced in terms of tempo. The song suddenly shifts all of it’s momentum and starts off with a completely different tune from 02:37, with Marx increasing the pitch by a notch. And then comes the moment we’ve all been waiting for – That epic guitar rift (Courtesy Bruce Gaitsch). Don’t get confused here: It’s not an electric lead, or any type of shredding that I’m talking about here; it’s an acoustic guitar rift. And yet, it’s just so beautiful. The simplicity of the song is the factor which completely won me. The rifts are extremely easy to perform (I learned the guitar 2 years ago, and this was the second rift I could ever play). It’s soft, subtle, and perfectly suits the song mood. Marx takes over again at 03:21, with starts with the chorus at 03:32. He makes sure to maintain the ‘edge’ in his voice till the very end. The vocals end at 03:52, and the song proceeds into ending mode with a dual of the acoustic guitar and the piano rift, and the ends at 04:24.

Rating: A flat out 10/10 for this one! Awesome vocals, soft melody, even better guitar and piano rift – all bundled in one! A must listen to!!

Lyrics link for “Right Here Waiting”http://artists.letssingit.com/richard-marx-lyrics-right-here-waiting-hrnnzh2

Download link for “Right Here Waiting”http://media.kickstatic.com/kickapps/images/67853/audios/601417.mp3

 

Album Art

“Right Here Waiting” is a song from Richard Marx’s album “Repeat Offender”

 

 

Okay, let me be really frank here. I didn’t even know Europe until 2004 (Guilty as charged!). The first time I heard them was when I was in the fourth grade. I still remember it clearly – I was in a gathering, where a bunch of my friends had decided to perform a small skit. The theme song was, of course, the musical version of “The Final Countdown“. From that day onwards, the song was embedded in my brain. But the problem was, no one knew the title of the song. At last, I finally got acquainted with the song in 2006, when my older sister played it on her computer. Ah, the memories! Today, I’ll be reviewing “The Final Countdown”, for reliving those cherished days. So, let’s get to it!

Band

Europe [L-R] : Ian Haugland, Mic Michaeli, John Norum, Joey Tempest, John Levén

 

History: “The Final Countdown” is a song from Europe’s 1986 album, “The Final Countdown“. Performance wise, it tore through the charts, and reached Number 1 in over 25 countries! How cool is that? It peaked at Number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100 charts, and Number 18 on the Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks chart. “The Final Countdown” was released in the spring of 1986 and became the most successful song from The Final Countdown (Album) on the American rock charts and as well as the band’s most recognizable and popular song (It was undoubtedly their signature song). For the complete chart performance, click here. There are two versions of this song, one being the 5 Minute 9 Seconds Album Version (Which I’ll be reviewing) and the other being 4 Minutes 3 Seconds Radio Edit Version.

Review: The song starts with some rumbling noises (Till today, I really couldn’t make out what the instrument is. If you guys know which one, please leave the answer in the comments). Then the legendary instrumental music (It’s a piano rift, actually) starts at 00:13. It’s what made this song so famous. The tune is REALLY catchy, and becomes more so once the beats kick in at 00:51. The momentum of the song is suddenly disrupted at 01:18, and Joey Tempest initiates the vocals at 01:26. Another thing about the beats. It raises the tempo of the song quite considerably; and helps it stay fast paced. The vocals are well suited for this song; the tone being a little submissive, but packing enough punch. It accentuates the rhythm of the song perfectly. The first chorus starts at 01:57, and ends like a breeze. Just like that, the second stanza begins (02:15); and you never knew what hit you. The tempo of the song is just amazing! (An ideal workout song!) The second chorus starts at 02:46, succeeded by the groovy tune, and a little bit of “Final Countdown” chanted here and there. The whole song momentarily turns around at 03:12, and then an EPIC guitar solo is initiated from 03:16. It’s absolutely stunning. It’s got a kind of monotonous tune to it, but accompanied by some really fast shredding; and a REALLY well executed loop (03:32 – 03:39). The guitar solo merges with the piano rift at 03:49, and it all comes together again at 04:09. The stanza’s end there itself; and it’s actually an instrumental rift from 04:09 till the ending, with the exception of the addition of those “It’s The Final Countdown” parts in between. The song fades off at 04:56, and ends at 05:09.

Rating: The REALLY addictive piano rift, hardcore beats, awesome vocals and an astounding guitar solo make “The Final Countdown” easily eligible for the 10/10 it deserves! Go listen to this one guys!

 

Lyrics for “The Final Countdown” : http://artists.letssingit.com/europe-lyrics-the-final-countdown-x516sfv

Download link for “The Final Countdown” : http://static.blog4ever.com/2006/02/109139/artfichier_109139_267826_201108181935485.mp3 (Right Click on link, click “Save Target/Link As”)

 

Album Art

“The Final Countdown” is a song from Europe’s album titled “The Final Countdown”